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Topic: Pendrive repair failures

I've used GParted many x's before and always achieved desired results. However...there's always exceptions to the 'rule". I have an 8Gb (7.45Gb useable) Sandisk Cruiser Glide that's defying any/all attempts to get it back in working order. The pendrive is not recognized by O.S's, but is by a number of "pendrive" repair tools. Here's what I've tried and failed at. 1. format 2. delete/add new partition. What 'report" I'm getting from Gparted; GParted shows yellow warning triangle, then black square box, then "unknown file system". When I tried 'format" a "menu box" apperared, but it was completely blank and did nothing. When trying to delete/rebuild partition, as soon as I tik "apply", Gparted freezes up. NEVER had anything like this occur before. Haven't a clue as to pendrive's problem for I cannot get "read-out" on it performance. It does show up for GParted, all of it's(the pendrive) specs, but nothing else. Not sure what else I can do. It's gotta be something simple I'm overlooking, but I haven't a clue. There's nothing "on" the drive that I can't replace, so data loss is not an issue. I'm running GParted out of Puppylinux "live".

Bangin' My Head

Rick

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Re: Pendrive repair failures

The yellow triangle can give you a description of the problem.

Other suggestions:
- Try to make a new partition table. This will delete the old partition table (and existing partitions and content). Then you can try to make a new partition.
- Try GParted from another Linux Distro, and/or from the GParted Live USB (or CD). Furthermore, be sure to use the latest version. Very often Linux distros contain older GParted versions.
- Check the pendrive using test software from the manufacturer (usually available from the support web pages of the manufacturers).

*** It is highly recommended to backup any important files before doing resize/move operations. ***

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Re: Pendrive repair failures

class413 wrote:

The yellow triangle can give you a description of the problem.

Other suggestions:
- Try to make a new partition table. This will delete the old partition table (and existing partitions and content). Then you can try to make a new partition.
- Try GParted from another Linux Distro, and/or from the GParted Live USB (or CD). Furthermore, be sure to use the latest version. Very often Linux distros contain older GParted versions.
- Check the pendrive using test software from the manufacturer (usually available from the support web pages of the manufacturers).

RE: class413

   Appreciate your response. I agree with your assessment of the yellow triangle, just don't know how to access what's it's telling. Have tried, and failed, to make new partition table. When attempted, after tiking 'apply", what looked like a "menu" appeared(?), but was completely blank..don't know what to make of that. And, yes, your not the first to suggest trying gparted in another distro, which I plan to do. I will go see what Sandisk has to offer.

THANKS!

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Re: Pendrive repair failures

You can access the warning info from the yellow triangle by clicking on it (or right clicking, I don't remember exactly) with the mouse.

Another source of info on hardware problems is the dmesg command output. You open a terminal window and give the command
sudo dmesg
You can lunch the command before connecting the pendrive in the port. If the system faces problems accessing the pendrive's content (hardware problems), you 'll see repeated attempts and failure reports.

The term "I/O error" is usually related to hardware problems.

*** It is highly recommended to backup any important files before doing resize/move operations. ***

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Re: Pendrive repair failures

I've "restored" the pendrive. Problem is, I'm not exactly sure what process did the trick. I was able to format the drive after using a program the "recovered" some of the data from the drive. Which still leaves questions, that, to me, just don't make sense. I would like to mark this post as "solved", but the truth be, I can't say for sure , how. RE: class413 This is strange...when I plugged the pendrive in today instead of the "warning triangle' it became an "information" icon??? After that, I was able to take some of the data off the drive, and then, for whatever reason, I could format it. But the weird part was that when accessing the data, it showed files that were to be over written, but not the "main" file which was an operating system??? Now, it is formatted in Fat32 with a discrepancy... before there were 7.45Gb accessable, now there is only 7.42??? Just weird after weird. OH, since your a moderator, are we allowed to post links of, perhaps, competing software...for that was one of the programs I used that started the process to 'repair".?

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Re: Pendrive repair failures

For me, a pendrive that behaves strangely and becomes hard to format, is suspect for imminent hardware failure. I had myself more that one time such sticks that I was able to reformat after several attempts and that definitely stopped working some days later.

I would suggest a check with manufacturer's test software to prove that it is able to take data. I mean, you have to be sure that the problem was purely from software (e.g. corrupted filesystem or allocation tables), not of hardware nature. Anyway, a pendrive is never a safe medium for critical data, don't forget it!

About the warning triangle / info icon, without knowing what was the previous message it is not possible to guess; however I suspect it was a warning about unrecognizable format or corrupted filesystem (or, in some cases, that GParted couldn't access the partition because it was already mounted, I don't think it was this case).

The 0.02 GB difference could be a drive space marked defective for some reason by the formatting software. The format report could give perhaps more info on this point. If so, it is an indication of hardware issues.

About the GParted software: GParted offers an easy to use graphical interface for a number of software tools. Each one of these tools can be used from the command line with many options. The GParted interface gives access to some of these options only, and especially the "safer" ones for the user. This means that we avoid to give direct access to options that can make things worse and even include special warnings before some potentially "dangerous" operations. It is always possible to use the specific s/w tools (included in the GParted live pack) from the command line, using command line options that overcome some "safe" options. Some experienced users or professionals can do so, however working with partition tables is an advanced topic even for professionals.

*** It is highly recommended to backup any important files before doing resize/move operations. ***